Kids are Kids

One after another they filed into the studio. Each portrayed a different level of confidence, most leaning on the Airmen who brought them in. As they sat in front of […]

One after another they filed into the studio. Each portrayed a different level of confidence, most leaning on the Airmen who brought them in. As they sat in front of the video camera, lights shining in their faces, they were given a series of questions.

The public affairs office participated in the “bring your child to work day,” by setting up a camera in the studio and having the kids get a real-life feel for what it’s like to be in front of a camera. They were asked questions like the following: What’s your name? How old are you? Is your mom or dad in the Air Force? What does your parent do in the Air Force? What’s it like to be a military kid?

The questions varied depending on the kid and his/her age. The younger ones were fairly shy, the older ones a bit more eager to express their thoughts. There seemed to be a common theme among most – almost a confusion when they were asked what it’s like to be a military kid.

They don’t think there’s a difference between being a regular kid or being a military kid. They don’t feel different. Their moms and/or dads go to work just like everyone else’s moms or dads.

Moral of my story -because their moms and dads decided to serve their country and continue to protect their freedoms, their kids have the opportunity to “just be kids!”

Here are some photos from their time in the studio:

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